Latest

  • Navigating beneath the Arctic ice

    Under the ice, there is no GPS reception. But mapping the Arctic Ocean beneath the ice sheet is essential to understanding the effects of climate change. MIT has now developed a navigation method based on sound.
    June 21, 2021
  • Exploring the impact of microplastics

    Exploring the impact of microplastics

    Microplastics in the sea are a danger to plants, animals and humans. To better assess the impact of these mini-particles, an EU project will measure their size and concentration off the Norwegian coast from 2023. A sensor developed in Switzerland will play a crucial role.
    June 14, 2021
  • Technology that breaks the mold

    Technology that breaks the mold

    Spatial augmented reality uses real-time projections to expand our perception of our three-dimensional world, creating perfect illusions of fantasy. Researcher and pioneer Martin Fröhlich demonstrates just what this technology is capable of.
    June 11, 2021
  • Knitted roads

    Knitted roads

    Road pavements require bitumen as a binder. But its production has many disadvantages. Empa researchers are now experimenting with string, which holds gravel together without the need for concrete - and is also more flexible, more permeable to rainwater and more environmentally friendly.
    June 07, 2021
  • A robot with superpowers

    MIT researchers have built a robot that can locate hidden objects through walls or packaging. To do this, it uses radio waves. In the future, this could simplify logistics in warehouses, for example.
    May 31, 2021
  • Observing atomic processes

    Observing atomic processes

    Microchips are becoming smaller and smaller: hard drives write entire encyclopedias on discs the size of a fingernail. Many processes take place at the atomic level - and little is known about them. Now PSI researchers have reached a milestone.
    May 26, 2021

Quote of the day

Short news

  • Navigating beneath the Arctic ice

    Under the ice, there is no GPS reception. But mapping the Arctic Ocean beneath the ice sheet is essential to understanding the effects of climate change. MIT has now developed a navigation method based on sound.
  • Exploring the impact of microplastics

    Microplastics in the sea are a danger to plants, animals and humans. To better assess the impact of these mini-particles, an EU project will measure their size and concentration off the Norwegian coast from 2023. A sensor developed in Switzerland will play a crucial role.
    Exploring the impact of microplastics
  • Knitted roads

    Road pavements require bitumen as a binder. But its production has many disadvantages. Empa researchers are now experimenting with string, which holds gravel together without the need for concrete - and is also more flexible, more permeable to rainwater and more environmentally friendly.
    Knitted roads
  • A robot with superpowers

    MIT researchers have built a robot that can locate hidden objects through walls or packaging. To do this, it uses radio waves. In the future, this could simplify logistics in warehouses, for example.
  • Observing atomic processes

    Microchips are becoming smaller and smaller: hard drives write entire encyclopedias on discs the size of a fingernail. Many processes take place at the atomic level - and little is known about them. Now PSI researchers have reached a milestone.
    Observing atomic processes
  • High melanin yield from the honey fungus

    Melanin is more valuable than gold. Researchers at Empa recently succeeded in extracting large quantities of the pigment from the honey fungus. One of the intended applications of this versatile substance is to restore antique wind instruments.
    High melanin yield from the honey fungus
  • Machines learn faster in quantum systems

    For AI systems, learning in “superposition” pays off. It allows them to simultaneously pursue multiple paths and thus learn faster.
    Machines learn faster in quantum systems
  • An opportunity for sustainable urban development

    Viennese complexity researchers have found a method to predict the growth of cities. This could facilitate much more efficient urban development and help conserve resources.
    An opportunity for sustainable urban development
  • Surviving on Mars – thanks to cyanobacteria

    Cyanobacteria may be able to thrive even in the inhospitable conditions on Mars. They are excellent oxygen producers and could enable astronauts to survive self-sufficiently on future missions.
    Surviving on Mars – thanks to cyanobacteria
  • Smart ropes

    A new coating for ropes can save lives: Ropes with this coating change color when they have been exposed to excessive heat and might break.
    Smart ropes

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