Latest

  • Material transforms from flexible to rigid on command

    Material transforms from flexible to rigid on command

    A material inspired by chainmail can transform from a foldable, fluid-like state into specific solid shapes.
    September 27, 2021
  • AI reveals connection between sugar and covid

    AI reveals connection between sugar and covid

    A team from EPFL wanted to know what diabetes has to do with the course of covid and used artificial intelligence to analyse 250,000 studies.
    September 20, 2021
  • Cheap raw material for smartphones and solar cells

    Cheap raw material for smartphones and solar cells

    Whether for smartphone screens or solar cells: Precious metals such as iridium or ruthenium are in high demand. Researchers from Basel have developed a cheaper and less toxic alternative.
    September 13, 2021
  • Moderna co-founder Bob Langer in conversation

    Moderna co-founder Bob Langer in conversation

    Robert Langer (73) has saved millions of lives with his research: His work with messenger RNA provides genetic blueprints with which the human body can produce antiviral proteins itself. This research forms the basis for the most successful Covid 19 vaccines, such as the vaccine produced by the manufacturer Moderna. Langer is a co-founder of the company and has become a billionaire since the Corona pandemic.
    September 06, 2021
  • First microsurgery with robot

    First microsurgery with robot

    Pioneering micro-surgery: At the University Hospital in Zurich, a patient was given the finest connections between lymph vessels and veins - by robot.
    September 06, 2021
  • Solar cells from the printer

    Solar cells from the printer

    The solar cells from the inkjet printer are ultra-thin and flexible - and should also work inside buildings.
    August 30, 2021
  • Researchers investigate environmental risks of nanomedicines

    Nanomaterials are opening up new possibilities in medicine. But what if such nanomaterials escape into the environment? Empa researchers are currently assessing potential risks.
  • Fiber optic cables reveal the inner workings of glaciers

    Fiber optic cables offer seismologists new possibilities to investigate the interior of glaciers. One day, this method may even make it possible to predict glacial collapse.
  • ETH mathematicians facilitate rescue at sea

    Researchers have developed a method of calculation that speeds up the search for people in distress at sea. Their new algorithm can be used to predict where objects or people are likely to drift to on the sea surface.
  • Study: Reducing the carbon footprint of houses and cars also saves money

    It is possible to reduce the carbon footprint attributable to driving and housing while saving money at the same time. This has been determined by researchers from the “Bioenergy and Sustainable Technologies” (BEST) competence center in Wieselburg, Austria.
  • Researchers at the University of Zurich develop extremely agile drones

    Researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) have developed a system that enables flying robots to be very agile. A new type of camera allows autonomous drones to respond much faster than if they were controlled by a human pilot.
  • University of Zurich teaches drones tricks

    Thanks to a navigation algorithm, drones are learning to autonomously perform acrobatic maneuvers. Using simulations, the autonomous aircraft are trained to become faster, more agile, and more efficient.
  • ETH builds ultrafast chip of the future

    Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) have discovered what the computer industry has been looking for since 20 years: A method of combining light and electronics on an ultrafast chip. Their plasmonic chip is more powerful, smaller, and cheaper to produce than any previous technology.

Quote of the day

Short news

  • Material transforms from flexible to rigid on command

    A material inspired by chainmail can transform from a foldable, fluid-like state into specific solid shapes.
    Material transforms from flexible to rigid on command
  • AI reveals connection between sugar and covid

    A team from EPFL wanted to know what diabetes has to do with the course of covid and used artificial intelligence to analyse 250,000 studies.
    AI reveals connection between sugar and covid
  • Cheap raw material for smartphones and solar cells

    Whether for smartphone screens or solar cells: Precious metals such as iridium or ruthenium are in high demand. Researchers from Basel have developed a cheaper and less toxic alternative.
    Cheap raw material for smartphones and solar cells
  • First microsurgery with robot

    Pioneering micro-surgery: At the University Hospital in Zurich, a patient was given the finest connections between lymph vessels and veins - by robot.
    First microsurgery with robot
  • Solar cells from the printer

    The solar cells from the inkjet printer are ultra-thin and flexible - and should also work inside buildings.
    Solar cells from the printer
  • Smartwatch activates insulin production

    ETH researchers have developed a method that could possibly replace insulin injections for diabetics in the future. In a gene network built into cells, insulin production can be switched on with green light.
    Smartwatch activates insulin production
  • Robot dispenses hugs on demand

    Need a hug and no one familiar to wrap your arms around? A doctoral student at the "Max Planck ETH Center for Learning Systems" is developing a hugging robot that could once alleviate loneliness.
    Robot dispenses hugs on demand
  • Drone searches independently

    Researchers have developed a drone that can locate missing people in dense forests. It performs all calculations on board, flies fully autonomously and continuously optimizes its flight path.
    Drone searches independently
  • The sensor that sweats with you

    Engineers at MIT have developed a sweat-proof electronic "skin." The design could lead to adaptable, wearable monitors for monitoring skin cancer and other diseases.
    The sensor that sweats with you
  • New material collects drinking water from the air

    Tiny structures allow a newly created material to collect drinkable water from the air day and night, combining two water collection technologies into one.
    New material collects drinking water from the air

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