Latest

  • New material collects drinking water from the air

    New material collects drinking water from the air

    Tiny structures allow a newly created material to collect drinkable water from the air day and night, combining two water collection technologies into one.
    July 26, 2021
  • New algorithms help with anesthesia

    New algorithms help with anesthesia

    Anesthetic drugs affect the brain. But to tell if a patient will remain unconscious during surgery, most anesthesiologists rely on heart rate, breathing rate and movement. Algorithms could improve this process.
    July 19, 2021
  • Robot evokes ghost illusions in Parkinson's patients

    Robot evokes ghost illusions in Parkinson's patients

    Researchers have succeeded in evoking tangible but invisible presences in Parkinson's patients with the help of a robot.
    July 12, 2021
  • How to keep your underwear clean in space

    How to keep your underwear clean in space

    Astronauts cannot do their laundry - and also have to share certain items of clothing with their colleagues. Austrian researchers are now investigating how microbes could be used to keep more than just underwear clean in space.
    July 05, 2021
  • In the realm of the digital supermodels

    In the realm of the digital supermodels

    With its virtual supermodels, a digital model agency is set to shake up the fashion industry; the stylish avatars have already been featured in major campaigns. The idea came from a fashion photographer who grew tired of the industry while he was doing Barbie doll makeovers.
    July 01, 2021
  • Algorithm decodes peculiarities of different yodeling styles

    Algorithm decodes peculiarities of different yodeling styles

    An algorithm confirms what yodelers have been telling each other for a long time: Northwestern Swiss and Central Swiss yodels can be distinguished.
    June 28, 2021
  • Fiber optic cables reveal the inner workings of glaciers

    Fiber optic cables offer seismologists new possibilities to investigate the interior of glaciers. One day, this method may even make it possible to predict glacial collapse.
  • Researchers investigate environmental risks of nanomedicines

    Nanomaterials are opening up new possibilities in medicine. But what if such nanomaterials escape into the environment? Empa researchers are currently assessing potential risks.
  • Study: Reducing the carbon footprint of houses and cars also saves money

    It is possible to reduce the carbon footprint attributable to driving and housing while saving money at the same time. This has been determined by researchers from the “Bioenergy and Sustainable Technologies” (BEST) competence center in Wieselburg, Austria.
  • ETH mathematicians facilitate rescue at sea

    Researchers have developed a method of calculation that speeds up the search for people in distress at sea. Their new algorithm can be used to predict where objects or people are likely to drift to on the sea surface.
  • Researchers at the University of Zurich develop extremely agile drones

    Researchers at the University of Zurich (UZH) have developed a system that enables flying robots to be very agile. A new type of camera allows autonomous drones to respond much faster than if they were controlled by a human pilot.
  • Innovative material surfaces to combat germs in hospitals

    Biofilms are not documentaries about nature, but resilient accumulations of germs, which particularly in hospitals can present a health hazard. Now, Swiss researchers are developing new types of material surfaces to deny these stubborn germ cultures a breeding ground.
  • ETH builds ultrafast chip of the future

    Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) have discovered what the computer industry has been looking for since 20 years: A method of combining light and electronics on an ultrafast chip. Their plasmonic chip is more powerful, smaller, and cheaper to produce than any previous technology.

Quote of the day

Short news

  • New material collects drinking water from the air

    Tiny structures allow a newly created material to collect drinkable water from the air day and night, combining two water collection technologies into one.
    New material collects drinking water from the air
  • New algorithms help with anesthesia

    Anesthetic drugs affect the brain. But to tell if a patient will remain unconscious during surgery, most anesthesiologists rely on heart rate, breathing rate and movement. Algorithms could improve this process.
    New algorithms help with anesthesia
  • Robot evokes ghost illusions in Parkinson's patients

    Researchers have succeeded in evoking tangible but invisible presences in Parkinson's patients with the help of a robot.
    Robot evokes ghost illusions in Parkinson's patients
  • How to keep your underwear clean in space

    Astronauts cannot do their laundry - and also have to share certain items of clothing with their colleagues. Austrian researchers are now investigating how microbes could be used to keep more than just underwear clean in space.
    How to keep your underwear clean in space
  • Algorithm decodes peculiarities of different yodeling styles

    An algorithm confirms what yodelers have been telling each other for a long time: Northwestern Swiss and Central Swiss yodels can be distinguished.
    Algorithm decodes peculiarities of different yodeling styles
  • Navigating beneath the Arctic ice

    Under the ice, there is no GPS reception. But mapping the Arctic Ocean beneath the ice sheet is essential to understanding the effects of climate change. MIT has now developed a navigation method based on sound.
  • Exploring the impact of microplastics

    Microplastics in the sea are a danger to plants, animals and humans. To better assess the impact of these mini-particles, an EU project will measure their size and concentration off the Norwegian coast from 2023. A sensor developed in Switzerland will play a crucial role.
    Exploring the impact of microplastics
  • Knitted roads

    Road pavements require bitumen as a binder. But its production has many disadvantages. Empa researchers are now experimenting with string, which holds gravel together without the need for concrete - and is also more flexible, more permeable to rainwater and more environmentally friendly.
    Knitted roads
  • A robot with superpowers

    MIT researchers have built a robot that can locate hidden objects through walls or packaging. To do this, it uses radio waves. In the future, this could simplify logistics in warehouses, for example.
  • Observing atomic processes

    Microchips are becoming smaller and smaller: hard drives write entire encyclopedias on discs the size of a fingernail. Many processes take place at the atomic level - and little is known about them. Now PSI researchers have reached a milestone.
    Observing atomic processes

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